Agenda

 

Tuesday, April 18th  
4:00pm – 4:45pmRegistration
4:45pm – 5:00pm Welcome Remarks


Helen Boaden, Joan Shorenstein Fellow at Harvard’s Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy, former Director of BBC Radio, BBC News and controller of Radio 4

5:00pm – 5:10pm 

Douglas W. Elmendorf, Dean of the Harvard Kennedy School of Government

5:10pm – 5:40pmOpening Session: The Sense of Us and Economic Development


Ricardo Hausmann, Professor of the Practice of Economic Development at the Harvard Kennedy School and Director of the Center for International Development at Harvard University

5:40pm – 6:50pm 

Keynote Conversation: Moral and Cultural Foundations of The Sense of Us

Humans are social beings, predisposed towards organizing in groups. However, the same forces that promote group belonging might also trigger conflicts across group boundaries. As small groups become increasingly less isolated there are enormous opportunities for rationally motivated collaboration but also for instinctively rooted clashes. Hence, in order for societies to be successful they require a set of cultural dynamics, institutions and moral maxims that allow them to successfully navigate this tension. In this session we will address the following questions: What are the main drivers of group formation? How are group boundaries set? What motivates conflicts across groups? What are the main characteristics of successful societies? What elements could enable social change in a context of looming potential clashes?

Joshua Greene, Professor of Psychology at Harvard University, Director of the Moral Cognition Lab at Harvard University and author of "Moral Tribes: Emotion, Reason and the Gap between Us and Them"

Michèle Lamont, Professor of Sociology and of African and African American Studies and the Robert. I. Goldman Professor of European Studies at Harvard University, President of the American Sociological Association, Director of Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard University and Co-director of the Successful Societies Program at the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research

Moderated by: Helen Boaden, Joan Shorenstein Fellow at Harvard’s Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy, former Director of BBC Radio, BBC News and controller of Radio 4

6:50pm – 7:45pmCocktail
7:45pm – 9:30pm

Dinner & Keynote: Human Development and the Ever Expanding Scope of Cooperation

The mechanisms through which individuals interact with each other and organize themselves in societies might be shaped by long-run evolutionary forces that incentivize cooperation. These evolutionary pressures are expressed in a process of natural selection that favors complexity in human societies and the ability to reap “non-zero-sum-gains.” This development results in an ever expanding scope of cooperation as the rewards for cooperating continually increase. Cooperation pushes forward human development as it enables access to previously unreachable goods and ideas; it also allows for collective solutions to shared challenges and enables societies to band together in the pursuit for a greater ideal. However, in practice, cooperation is underpinned by set of moral foundations that shape a “sense of us” and that defines the collective identity, norms and tradition of those that cooperate. Therefore, conflicts in the “sense of us” of prospective collaborators might temporarily thwart cooperation with significant societal consequences. In this session we will discuss: What are the evolutionary forces that incentivize cooperation? What are the benefits of ever expanding cooperation? What kind of crisis may arise when there is a conflict in the “sense of us?” How can these tensions influence the scope for collaboration over time? How can a new equilibrium be reached?

Robert Wright, Journalist, Founder of Meaningoflifet.tv and Bloggingheads.tv, former Senior Editor at The Atlantic and author of “The Moral Animal”, “Nonzero” and “The Evolution of God”


Wednesday, April 19th  
8:00am-8:35amBreakfast
8:35am-8:50amWelcome Remarks


Ricardo Hausmann, Professor of the Practice of Economic Development at the Harvard Kennedy School and Director of the Center for International Development at Harvard University

8:50am-9:30amAn Agenda for Economic Development


Frank Neffke, Senior Research Fellow, Center for International Development at Harvard University

Miguel Angel Santos, Senior Research Fellow, Center for International Development at Harvard University

9:30am-10:50am

Session One: Authentic Leadership: How to Identify and Articulate Policy Innovations to Address Context Specific Policy Issues

The traditional approach to address major policy issues has been to identify deviations from externally nominated “best practices”; this process has garnered an admittedly checkered range of results. However, successful policy leaders across the globe have begun to pursue an alternative path, allowing for the local nomination and articulation of solutions that are tailor-made to the challenges they face and the context in which they operate. Under this alternative approach, international experiences are not to be imitated but rather adapted and proposed policies are necessarily idiosyncratic. The challenge faced by policymakers may not be how conform to international standards, but how to identify the best way forward for “us.” In this session we will focus on: How are governments designing and implementing solutions to tackle their more transformative challenges? How should the lessons from past experiences and international experiences be adequately leveraged? What are the main challenges of deviating from “best practices”? What can be gained from authentic leadership and an idiosyncratic focus?

Arbi Mazniku, Deputy Mayor, City of Tirana, Albania

Luis Fernando Castro, President of Bancoldex in Colombia and Former CEO of the Barranquilla Chamber of Commerce

Sujeewa Senasinghe, Minister of International Trade of Sri Lanka, Former Deputy Minister of Justice and Member of the Sri Lanka Parliament for Colombo District

Moderated by: Robert Lawrence, Albert L. Williams Professor of International Trade and Investment and Faculty Chair of the Practice of Trade Policy executive program at Harvard Kennedy School, Senior Fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, and Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research

10:50am-11:10amBreak
11:10am-12:10pm

Session Two: Problem Driven Iterative Adaptation (PDIA) for Economic Diversification

Sri Lanka has been moving towards diversifying their economy. CID has conducted a growth diagnostic and is now helping the Government of Sri Lanka implement some of the recommendations using PDIA. This session will describe the PDIA process being used and will provide a progress update on the work.

Matt Andrews, Associate Professor at the Harvard Kennedy School, Faculty Associate of the Center for International Development at Harvard University and author of "Building State Capability: Evidence, Analysis and Action"

12:10pm-1:30pmLunch & Keynote
 

Pravin Gordhan*, Former Minister of Finance of South Africa and Former Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Moderated by: Helen Boaden, Joan Shorenstein Fellow at Harvard’s Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy, former Director of BBC Radio, BBC News and controller of Radio 4

*Via Skype

1:30pm-2:50pm

Session Three: Migration, Relatedness and Cultural Learning - What are the Main Barriers and Enablers to the Diffusion of Knowledge?

The diffusion of new ideas and productive knowhow is critical for the advancement of societies. However, the process through which innovations disseminate is often constrained within groups of common cultural background-color. Promoting interaction between culturally and ethnically different groups might be critical to accelerate the process through which groups learn. In this session we will tackle the following questions: How does knowhow diffuse? What are the main structural and policy constraints to the diffusion of innovations? How can the “sense of us” facilitate or hamper interaction with others?

Enrico Spolaore, Professor of Economics at Tufts University, Research Associate with the National Bureau of Economic Research and author of “Culture and Economic Growth”

Ljubica Nedelkoska, Research Fellow, Center for International Development at Harvard University

Sari Pekkala Kerr, Senior Research Scientist at the Wellesley Centers for Women at Wellesley College, former Scientific Secretary of the European Regional Science Association and International Expert in the European Union Mutual Learning Panel on the Economics of Immigration

Moderated by: Lant Pritchett, Professor of the Practice of International Development at the Harvard Kennedy School, Faculty Chair of the MPA/ID Program and Senior Fellow of the Center for Global Development and author of "Building State Capability: Evidence, Analysis and Action" and "Let their People Come: Breaking the Gridlock on Global Labor Mobility"

2:50pm-3:10pmBreak
3:10pm-4:20pm

Session Four: Globalization and the Backlash of Populism - Will a Changing Sense of Identity Pull the World Apart or Bring It Closer Together?

On both sides of the Atlantic, populism is on the rise. What accounts for voters’ growing revolt against the status quo? A prevailing explanation is that rising populism amounts to a rebellion by “globalization’s losers.” Under this explanation populist movements have sought to capitalize the discontent generated by the pursuit of fully integrated world markets and the tension behind the perceived threat of mass inflows of migrants by exploiting divisions in society between “us” and “them.” The return to prominence of nativist movements not only jeopardizes the future of international cooperation but also sets the scene for the main political conflicts of the next generation to be centered on nationalism versus globalism. In this session we will discuss: What has triggered the rise to prominence of populist movements? What are the main economic and sociological drivers behind this phenomenon? What characterizes “nationalistic” and “globalist” identities? What is the role of geopolitical change in shaping populism? Is there any way to find balance between short term politics and long term returns? What may be the long-term consequences of the tension between these alternative ways of making sense of the world around us? How can capitalism and globalization be managed to fit the current global context? What is the role of global economic platforms (i.e., G-7 and G20) and international organizations (i.e., IMF and WB) in facilitating ongoing debates?

Erik Berglof, Director, Institute of Global Affairs (IGA), London School of Economics and non-resident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution

Mark Blyth, Eastman Professor of Political Economy, Professor of Political Science and International and Public Affairs at Brown University and author of “Great Transformations: Economic Ideas and Institutional Change in the Twentieth Century”, “Austerity: The History of a Dangerous Idea” and “The Future of the Euro”

Peter A. Hall, Krupp Foundation Professor of European Studies in the Department of Government and at the Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies, Harvard University, and Co-Director of the Program on Successful Societies for the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research

Moderated by: Helen Boaden, Joan Shorenstein Fellow at Harvard’s Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy, former Director of BBC Radio, BBC News and controller of Radio 4

4:20pm-4:30pmClosing Remarks


Ricardo Hausmann, Professor of the Practice of Economic Development at the Harvard Kennedy School and Director of the Center for International Development at Harvard University

4:30pm-6:00pmReception